Best Of Dallas

Best Hangover Cures in Dallas

Short Rib Angry Pho at Cris and John.
Short Rib Angry Pho at Cris and John. Courtesy of Cris and John
We’ve all been there. You wake up in the morning with a pounding headache and the feeling that you somehow managed to eat a bag of cotton balls while sleeping. You crawl out of bed and round up enough energy to at least brush your teeth and get a glass of cold water and two Advil. Then, you think, how can I make this misery go away pronto?

Your mind immediately turns to hangover food. Is it a greasy burger you crave? How about a bowl of menudo? Or perhaps chicken fried steak and eggs? We have rounded up a few places in North Texas where you'll find a speedy recovery. Add a two-hour nap afterward and you’ll likely be ready to rinse and repeat.

Burger

Sky Rocket Burger
Multiple Locations
If it’s a greasy cheeseburger you crave, smashed griddle burgers are the best hangover cure. Sky Rocket Burger has four locations in the Dallas area. The menu is simple: a junior, single, double or triple. For less than $13, you can have three juicy all-Angus beef patties, three slices of melted American cheese stuffed between fresh buns with your favorite condiments. Add grilled jalapeños for an extra wake-up call.
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Big Island Burger at TX BBQ & Burgers.
Hank Vaughn
TX BBQ & Burgers
3128 Forest Lane
If beef and smoke breathe life back into you after a long night, you'll love TX BBQ & Burgers as much as we do. Hunker down, make some elbow room and dig into a Big Island Burger. It's a six-ounce patty with sautéed mushrooms, onions and jalapeños, topped with American and Swiss cheese. It's served with fries and a drink for $8.99.

Phở

Cris and John
5555 Preston Oak Road
Looking for something a little less fattening, but no less comforting? A bowl of phở after a night of drinking will always do the body right. Cris and John in North Dallas is a great option. The restaurant's Angry Phở ($11) gives you a choice of rare beef and brisket, beef meatballs, beef short ribs, grilled chicken or fried tofu and is served with a beef broth infused with lemongrass and cayenne pepper. It's served with rice noodles with a side of sprouts, basil, jalapeños and lime and has a nice kick that you'll appreciate even before adding Sriracha sauce. The only downside is that Cris and John is closed on Saturdays, so plan your hangovers accordingly.


Phở Bắc
153 N. Plano Road, Richardson
Another great option for phở is the Tái Kobe Phở at Phở Bắc. It's your traditional beef phở but served with Kobe beef instead of the traditional sirloin, round eye or London broil. The meat literally melts in your mouth, and with the combination of noodles, broth, bean sprouts, Thai basil and Sriracha, you’ll be on the road to recovery before you know it. If you're lucky enough to have a hangover on a cold and rainy day, eating a bowl of phở will make the recovery process exponentially quicker.

Diner Fare

Luckys Cafe
3531 Oak Lawn Ave.
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Banana cognac pancakes at Luckys.
Luckys
Nothing screams the perfect hangover cure like a breakfast diner that specializes in bacon, eggs, pancakes and all things breakfast-related. If you’re looking for a great place to soak up the booze and get in your weekly people-watching fix, head directly to Luckys Café on Oak Lawn Avenue. The '50s-style diner has been serving Dallasites for more than 30 years, and while always crowded on the weekends, it attracts customers who know a thing or two about how to do Sunday fun days right. If a “hair of the dog” is in order, go for the bloody mary or mimosa and pair it with an order of banana cognac pancakes (two buttermilk pancakes topped with roasted cognac bananas and maple syrup), and you’ll be ready to tackle the upcoming week with a smile on your face.

Menudo or Pozole

Molcajetes
2306 S. Buckner Blvd.
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Menudo at Gonzalez Restaurant.
Angie Quebedeaux
Need something soothing, yet flavorful and a bit spicy? A bowl of menudo or pozole is just what the hangover doctor would order. Both are traditional Mexican soups that are served in authentic Mexican restaurants on the weekends only. Menudo has a red chili pepper base and is made with tripe, while pozole is a traditional guajillo soup with pork and hominy and garnished with lettuce, red radishes, dry oregano and fresh lime juice. A great place to enjoy both is Molcajetes on Buckner Boulevard in southeast Dallas. A bowl of each will run you $15. Pair that with a margarita and the roaming mariachi band that plays on the weekends, and you’ll be back to your old self in no time.

Gonzalez Restaurant
367 W. Jefferson Blvd. and 8121 Bruton Road
Another authentic place to get a bowl of savory and spicy menudo is Gonzalez Restaurant, with locations in Oak Cliff and Pleasant Grove. Gonzalez has served Dallas since 1973, using the highest-quality and freshest ingredients. And we all know, there is nothing like grandma’s cooking when you’re rallying back from a hangover.

Fried Chicken

Mike's Chicken
4234 Maple Ave.
If you’re craving something deep-fried, battered and delicious in the Oak Lawn or North Dallas/Forest Lane area, head over to Mike’s Chicken for some of the best-fried yard birds this city has to offer. The joint makes everything from scratch and starts the process of cooking the chicken only after you place your order. The chicken is spiced with sage, turmeric, lemon and ghost peppers, so it has a distinct taste with a nice kick. While you may have to wait a bit for your order, trust us when we say that the wait is worth it as you bite into the crunchy crust and tender and juicy meat.

Biscuits & Gravy

Norma's Cafe
Multiple Locations
How about a plate of soft, buttery and fluffy carbs smothered in a creamy Southern sausage gravy? There are several places in Dallas to partake in this delicious dish sent from heaven, but one of our favorites is Norma’s Café. While the traditional biscuits and gravy ($3.99) will cure whatever ails you, we’d recommend you splurge and go for the CBCG ($11.99), especially if a hangover is involved. You’ll get crispy chicken strips and bacon stacked over the homemade biscuit with eggs, hash browns and cheese, then smothered in Norma's homemade cream gravy.

Spicy Fish Soup

B2J Suancai
151 W. Spring Creek Parkway, No. 517, Plano

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Spicy fish soup.
Angie Quebedeaux
If you’re feeling a bit adventurous (and perhaps still a bit intoxicated) after a long night of indulging in your favorite cocktails, trust us when we say that a bowl of sour fish soup will do your body good. And B2J Suancai Fish is the best place to have it. This rich, sour, velvety and spicy dish is nothing short of spectacular. The broth is full of ribbons of pickled mustard greens, ginger, dried chilies and Szechuan peppercorns and it's loaded with your choice of tilapia, largemouth bass, wagyu beef or a combination of tilapia and beef. There are several other add-on options like tofu, cellophane noodles and enoki mushrooms, and you can choose your desired spice level (classic spicy, spicy or vine pepper numb). The portions are enormous, so we strongly recommend dragging your hungover best friends with you to share this dish while reminiscing about the debauchery of the night before.

Chicken and Waffles

Jonathon's Diner
1619 N. Beckley Ave.
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The famous chicken and waffles at Jonathon's next to the gravy, which should be equally famous.
Taylor Adams
Jonathon's should get keys to every city in Texas for its weekend breakfast offerings. The restaurant's chicken and waffles are what foggy weekend dreams are made of. Order with a carafe of one of its many mimosa offerings and you'll leave a new person, guaranteed.

Best Chicken-Fried Steak and Eggs

Meddlesome Moth
1621 Oak Lawn Ave.
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The chicken fried steak at AllGood Cafe.
Mike Snider
Besides Tex-Mex tacos and enchiladas, there is no dish more quintessential to Texas than chicken-fried steak. And if you’re hungover and in need of a battered and deep-fried pounded ribeye steak, this city has no shortage of great places to find it. The Meddlesome Moth’s version is served over grits and has a jalapeño gravy.

AllGood Cafe
2934 Main St.
We also love AllGood Cafe's because the steak is as big as the plate and the gravy has just the perfect amount of pepper. Both the Moth's and AllGood's versions are fantastic and will have you using them as an excuse to be hung over the following weekend just so you can indulge in either of these dishes once again.

Bagel Sandwiches

Shug's Bagels
3020 Mockingbird Lane
Perhaps you need a handheld hangover cure because your drinking shenanigans took place on a work or school night, and you must report for duty the next day. Shug’s Bagels, located near Southern Methodist University, offers some great breakfast bagel sandwiches, such as the Shug Sandwich, which has bacon, egg and cheese with a crispy hash brown on your choice of bagel, sandwich or wrap. If you’re not feeling a breakfast sandwich, the place also offers build-your-own deli sandwiches and a variety of chicken cutlet sandwiches, on your choice of bagel, sandwich or wrap.

Biscuit Sandwiches

The Biscuit Bar
Multiple Locations
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A Rough Night at the Biscuit Bar.
Biscuit Bar
There are times when hangover cures call for more than a sausage, egg and cheese biscuit from the McDonald’s drive-thru. If you’re having one of those hangovers, the only cure is the Rough Night from The Biscuit Bar. This biscuit has everything on it but the kitchen sink: Southern-fried chicken, burger patty, ham, turkey, pulled pork, crispy bacon, tater tots, cheddar cheese and house-made sausage gravy. If this doesn’t cure your hangover, nothing will.

Chili Cheese Dogs

BarNone
718 N. Buckner Blvd., No. 100
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That's a bacon-wrapped dog under there.
BarNone
People often encourage “hair of the dog” to cure a hangover. While that certainly helps, try pairing it with the chili cheese dog from BarNone in East Dallas. The dogs are bacon-wrapped and deep fried, served open-faced with chili, cheddar, mustard, grilled onions and house-made cherry pepper relish. 
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Angie Quebedeaux is a freelance food writer for the Observer. A "ragin' Cajun" from Lafayette, she's been in Dallas since 2002. She is an HR director by day and loves to “laissez les bon temps rouler.”

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