Commentary

The Five Best Songs Protesting Margaret Thatcher's Policies

Update: Judy Garland's "Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead" is forecast to be #1 on the British charts on Sunday, the day the official charts are released. I'm not even shitting you. This means that it will end up being played on Radio 1's Sunday Chart Show. Radio 1 is a Government-owned broadcaster. Can you imagine the clusterwhoops going on in the right-wing media at the moment? It's magnificent. The UK is the only country with a sense of humour dry enough to have something like this happen.

Original post follows...

Undoubtedly the most divisive leader in the recent history of the UK, Margaret Thatcher's death today has been greeted by the same polarized reaction that characterized her time in office. As a Brit who spent eight years living in the area of the UK most destroyed by Thatcherite politics, South Wales, my entire Facebook feed is rejoicing. This reaction might be strange to some, but the after-effects of her policies in the 1980s are still writ large over many, many downtrodden communities.

This is, of course, not a politics blog, but it's worth taking a few moments to highlight the incredible artistic response to Margaret Thatcher's Conservative government in the 1980s. While any right-wing government is always the target of opprobrium from the artistically-inclined left, such a polarizing government created a huge wave of artistic expression and permanently politicized a generation. Because I'm not into songs directly about Thatcher on today of all days, here are some of the great songs of the 1980s protesting the dire conditions facing working class and inner-city areas.

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Gavin Cleaver
Contact: Gavin Cleaver