Food News

Ariana Cuisine: Afghan Homestyle Eats on Lower Greenville

Korma sabzi – lamb in a tomato sauce with beans, served with basmati rice.
Korma sabzi – lamb in a tomato sauce with beans, served with basmati rice. Hank Vaughn
Ariana Cuisine is a little spot on Lower Greenville that specializes in Afghan food, though its menu also includes options that it describes as “authentic homestyle cuisine with a variety of halal and Mediterranean dishes.” It has a really small dining area with a couple of two-tops and one larger table that could seat perhaps six snugly. If you’re willing to gamble on being able to eat in and brave the parking situation, it is definitely worth a visit.

Yes, one should take public transportation if at all possible to this area (Mockingbird Station is just a brisk 10 minute walk away, after all) to avoid the parking hassle, but unfortunately that night we were car-bound. The two dedicated spots reserved on Greenville for Ariana’s were occupied, so we parked in the almost-empty small lot right next door.

Upon exiting the car, however, we saw some of the dozens of signs warning that this was parking for Aw Shucks only. Of course, whoever was parked in Ariana’s spots were not at the restaurant, so such reserved spaces seem to be more “suggestions” rather than rules, but who wants to chance being towed.

We entered Ariana and asked if anyone knew of available parking. The front of house person was extremely helpful and in the end let us park in the back of the restaurant. See, kids, this is why you use DART.
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Mantu – ground beef dumplings in bean and yoghurt sauce.
Hank Vaughn
The menu has appetizers such as bolani, naan, mantu … and tacos. We went with an order of mantu, yet another culture’s take on the humble dumpling. These are filled with ground beef and topped with tomato bean sauce as well as yoghurt and were extremely good. The wrappers are very thin and perfectly chewy, and the sauce piquant and bright.

The selection of mains includes kabobs, burgers, Afghan-style curries and rice dishes. We settled on korma sabzi and butter chicken, both of which come with rice and a salad. The salad was interesting, full of a variety of veggies such as cucumber, carrot, lettuce, onions and pepperoncini, all in a slightly spicy dressing. The whole thing was almost a bowlful of giardiniera, and we were pleasantly surprised at how well it all worked.
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Most mains come with a salad that is a tasty mix of peppers and veggies.
Hank Vaughn
The korma sabzi was a lamb curry with beans and spinach served with wonderful basmati rice. The tender chunks of lean lamb lived in a rich tomato-based sauce with spinach, beans and spices that created a lovely mélange of flavors. The beans were an interesting addition that worked surprisingly well.
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Korma sabzi – lamb in a tomato sauce with beans, served with basmati rice.
Hank Vaughn
Butter chicken is always a safe choice, and we weren’t disappointed here. It arrived in a rather large bowl along with the rice. The rich tomato and butter sauce was full of braised dark-meat chicken pieces, incredibly aromatic with the right amount of spice.
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Butter chicken – Ariana's slightly different take on the Indian standard.
Hank Vaughn
When we arrived, a group of friends or family were sitting around the large table, sharing several dishes family style, laughing and conversing between bites. They were obviously regulars who appreciate the different twist on this type of food that Ariana offers.

We do, too.

3607 Greenville Ave., Suite A. Sunday, 11 a.m. – 10 p.m.; Monday, 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.; Tuesday & Wednesday, 11 a.m. – midnight; Thursday – Saturday, 11 a.m. – 3 a.m.
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Hank Vaughn is a freelance writer who enjoys sharing and overthinking his food and drink experiences, both good and bad, from his culinary journeys with his wife across North Texas and beyond.
Contact: Hank Vaughn

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