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The Coolest Homes to Shelter in Place in Dallas

Rawlins Gilliland's place is a work of art.EXPAND
Rawlins Gilliland's place is a work of art.
Rawlins Gilliland

Even the most loyal of homebodies are sick of being inside their own homes these days. Many of us have yet to learn that when we need a change, we should redo our places instead of butchering our own bangs, even if that means switching the furniture around.

Since we are all coveting our neighbors' homes, we put together a collection of the coolest and most unique homes in Dallas for maximum quarantine envy.

Rawlins Gilliland, poet, former national sales director of Neiman Marcus and commentator for KERA,  lives in a space inspired by Henri Matisse. He discovered the painter at a young age and has been planning his dream home since. 

“I decided at 9 I wanted to create rooms where I felt like I was living INSIDE a painting room,” he says of his decor.

The mid-century home is a couple of blocks away from the Great Trinity Forest. Every square inch of the property has been thoughtfully embellished with Asian, African and Expressionist art since Gilliland purchased it in the 1980s. Even his Christmas tree is one of a kind, so there's no reason to take it down.

We are green with envy for Rawlins' home office.EXPAND
We are green with envy for Rawlins' home office.
Rawlins Gilliland
Even the dog looks good.EXPAND
Even the dog looks good.
Rawlins Gilliland
The coral walls, reds and greens make a Matisse dream.EXPAND
The coral walls, reds and greens make a Matisse dream.
Rawlins Gilliland
Gilliland's tree fits with his worldy decor.EXPAND
Gilliland's tree fits with his worldy decor.
Rawlins Gilliland

The home to the Rosegarden Funeral Home band members has been a backdrop to many legendary guest-only parties and a hub for music fans, artists and photographers. The large Dallas house is between Garland and Mesquite, in the middle of your Goth-rock dreams, and is a stylish extension of the group's aesthetic.

The Rosegarden Funeral Home is famous for its parties.EXPAND
The Rosegarden Funeral Home is famous for its parties.
Leah Lane
The red, blue and black hallway is peak Rosegarden.
The red, blue and black hallway is peak Rosegarden.
Leah Lane
Punk-Goth goddess Leah Lane in her staircase.EXPAND
Punk-Goth goddess Leah Lane in her staircase.
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
An elegant setting for poisoned tea.EXPAND
An elegant setting for poisoned tea.
Leah Lane

Dallas artists Brian K. Jones and Brian K. Scott have been partners for close to 30 years as the art duo Chuck & George, noted for their playful, fantastical and humorous work. Their Oak Cliff home is a place where boredom would be a sin.

Artist Preston Pannek is known for filling Deep Ellum's walls with pop culture scenes and for celebrating local heroes with his mural art. Pannek's home is covered by nine different murals, even on the outdoor dumpster. With music and art studios, arcade games and a bar, Pannek's 3,000-square-foot Deep Ellum loft is an ideal party house. The bathroom says it all. Literally.

You meet all sorts at Pannek's house.EXPAND
You meet all sorts at Pannek's house.
Alfonso Apodaca
If you run out of games to play, you can always make good use of the pole.EXPAND
If you run out of games to play, you can always make good use of the pole.
Alfonso Apodaca
What we wouldn't give for some color on our boring-ass walls.EXPAND
What we wouldn't give for some color on our boring-ass walls.
Alfonso Apodaca
Lucky dog is more entertained than we are.EXPAND
Lucky dog is more entertained than we are.
Alfonso Apodaca
Some people like having things to read in the bathroom.EXPAND
Some people like having things to read in the bathroom.
Alfonso Apodaca

Michael Roos is a long-time DJ, and his house is a thirst trap for music lovers with a colossal collection of vinyl, an adjoined music studio and walls lined with memorabilia. Roos' place is more like a Hard Rock Cafe than a house, though it probably has better food. 

Holy vinyl.EXPAND
Holy vinyl.
Michael Roos
Roos' music studio. We forgot to ask what he was watching.EXPAND
Roos' music studio. We forgot to ask what he was watching.
Michael Roos
Stevie Ray's signature AND part of the helicopter in which he crashed.EXPAND
Stevie Ray's signature AND part of the helicopter in which he crashed.
Michael Roos
Can't touch this jacket. Because it was once MC Hammer's.EXPAND
Can't touch this jacket. Because it was once MC Hammer's.
Michael Roos

In Dallas' Lakewood neighborhood, you'll find the home of Polyphonic Spree's and Tripping Daisy's Tim DeLaughter, and his family, who moved into the space in 2006.

DeLaughter's wife Julie Doyle says they added a second story to the house, and redesigned the landscape until the place looked like a "mid-century modern treehouse” —  as it sits up on a hill. The property is sleek, and full of music history. "We are a family of musicians," Doyle says... "and much music has been written in the studio looking over trees."

We just want to run up the DeLaughter house outdoors stairs and make that our daily cardio.EXPAND
We just want to run up the DeLaughter house outdoors stairs and make that our daily cardio.
Just Shoot2Sell
And here's another angle.EXPAND
And here's another angle.
Josh Jordan
The living room is something out of Nick-at-Nite.EXPAND
The living room is something out of Nick-at-Nite.
Josh Jordan
How groovy is this sh—?EXPAND
How groovy is this sh—?
Just Shoot2Sell

Jeremy and Kelsey Turner are hella nostalgic and know how to transport us right back to our childhoods. The '80s-themed "The McFly" draws inspiration from John Hughes movies. But, if the '90s is your era, the couple has another property, "The Slater," inspired by '90s sitcoms like Saved by the Bell. Both places are in Lower Greenville and feature a cereal bar and video games. The best part is you can rent both on AirBnB. So make a whole night of calling your crush and watching Winona Ryder movies.

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