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As We Head into Prime Produce Season, What Fruits and Veggies Are in Season Right Now?

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In the next few weeks, we'll be hitting prime produce season, when Texas' agricultural bounty becomes even more abundant. But if you're shopping at grocery stores each week and only hitting farmers markets sporadically, it's hard to know what's in season and what's not — and is there anything worse than a bland, out-of-season tomato or strawberry? Even if you're a farmers market regular, it's good to keep track of when your favorite produce comes in — maybe you want to pickle 30 jars of spring onions while they're in season (go now, hurry!), or maybe you're one of those folks who never misses a market during tomato time. Either way, keep this info handy so you know when these veggies are at their prime.

The Texas Department of Agriculture keeps a running list of what's in season and when, but the Dallas Farmers Market also sends out a handy list of what's locally in season in each week's email blast:

Fruits
Strawberries, grapefruit

Greens
Arugula, collards, kale varieties, Swiss chard, lettuces, salad mix, Napa cabbage, spinach, micro greens

Brassica
Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower

Roots
Red beets, golden beets, carrots, kolabrabi, sweet potato, spring onions, leeks, turnips, radishes, rutabaga

Vine Ripe
Tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers

Herbs
Cilantro, dill, fennel, mint, sage, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, lavender, thyme

Mushrooms
Shiitake, oyster, portabello

Flowers and plants
Edible flowers, flower bouquets, vegetable and herb transplants

According to the Texas Department of Agriculture's Produce Availability Chart, we've got some good stuff coming very soon: blackberries, blueberries, cantaloupes, honeydew, field peas, squash and zucchini.

Things to stock up on since they'll be out of season soon: broccoli, celery, kale, kohlrabi, oranges, beets and spinach. Things change, of course, with weather and seasonal differentials, but it's helpful to know what's comin' and what's goin', theoretically. 

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