Burgers

Find Stellar Sliders at Son of a Butcher on Lower Greenville

Son of a Butcher's sliders are bigger and come with creative touches you won't find at White Castle.
Son of a Butcher's sliders are bigger and come with creative touches you won't find at White Castle. Nick Reynolds
In a world where we’ve been conditioned to assume that bigger equals better, especially when it comes to burgers, the sliders at Son of a Butcher have a way of swiftly dispelling that notion. But don’t get it twisted. These aren’t the pint-sized sliders of White Castle or Krystal.

Robust slider patties accompanied by a flare for the creative (peanut butter and jelly sliders, anyone?) aren’t your father’s sliders.

Son of a Butcher has two locations in the Dallas area — one at Plano’s Legacy Hall and the other in the heart of Lower Greenville. A third is in the works that will land in Grapevine in February.

With a bag of sliders on our minds, we swung by the Dallas spot for lunch on a gorgeous Saturday afternoon. The patios lining Lower Greenville were already filling, and the neighborhood was bustling with foot traffic. We decided to pick up to-go and ordered through the website. A text 15 minutes later let us know our sliders were ready.

There’s a walkup-only pickup window, but with the lot behind Son of a Butcher filled to the brim, all we had to do was get to it. Hey, it’s Lower Greenville on the weekend. We lucked out and found a single narrow parking space behind Meyboom Brasserie (which we wrote about in November) and made the short walk across the street to the window.

On the menu are eight wagyu beef sliders, three chicken sliders and a veggie slider. The beef is sourced from North Texas’ own A Bar N Ranch. You can get two sliders for $8.50, three for $12.50 or a “slider sleeve” that will net you a butcher’s dozen for $49. Considering the quality of these sliders, these prices are pretty good.
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The Irishman: sharp Irish cheddar, Irish stout aioli, parsley salad and caramelized onion.
Nick Reynolds
Try the burnt ends slider: smoked brisket and melted Gouda with pickled red onion, rosemary lime aioli and the house barbecue sauce. The Irishman (sharp Irish cheddar, Irish stout aioli, parsley salad and caramelized onion) is another great choice.

In addition to the eight wagyu sliders on the menu, there was a butcher’s special (the Vincent Van GOAT). With herbed goat cheese, pickled onion and tomato dressed with charred broccolini slaw and pesto mayo, this slider had a tad too much going on for our tastes. Still, it wasn’t bad at all.
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The Vincent Van GOAT with herbed goat cheese, pickled onion and tomato dressed with charred broccolini slaw and pesto mayo.
Nick Reynolds
The most eccentric slider at SOB is the PB&J: crunchy peanut butter, blackberry jam, bacon and American cheese on a small yet stocky wagyu beef patty. Yes, we did just say that the butcher’s special had too much going on, but despite our slightly raised eyebrows when imagining this slider, it worked for us. The sweetness of the jam and peanut butter was balanced nicely by the savoriness of everything else.
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Take two or maybe four. The Texas Hot chicken slider might have you wanting more. No worries. They're small.
Nick Reynolds
We had to try at least one of the chicken sliders. Our pick was the Texas Hot, with hand-breaded, fried white-meat chicken with pimento cheese, hot sauce and pickle slices. It was feisty and packed with flavor, and we could’ve scarfed a bunch of these.

At SOB, they also offer a wild side of nacho fries: seasoned wagyu, queso fresco crumbles, cilantro, ranch and queso over crispy waffle fries ($5). And there are five milkshake options, all of which you can level up with alcohol ($7–8). A boozy cookie butter shake? Yes, please.

2026 Greenville Avenue. Monday – Thursday, 11 a.m. –10 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. – midnight; Saturday, 10 a.m. – midnight; Sunday, 10 a.m. – 10 p.m.
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