Eat This

My First Fat Ho Experience.

Lakita Evans rendered a stroke of marketing genius when she named her home-style burger joint in Waco Fat Ho Burgers. Because, truth be known, she's no fat ho. Evans just anticipated some fun to be had with the brash name.

And, fun it is. The play on words are endless. To prove the point, the white walls inside the small corner restaurant serve as a blank canvas for all the wit one can muster about eating a fat ho burger. One tip: Bring your own Sharpie.

The menu starts with a Supa Fly Ho with Cheese, but I had the Supa Dupa Fly Ho with Cheese, which comes with double meat. The Fiesty Ho has jalapeños; the Bad Mamajama has meat, three cheeses and bacon. An Overweight Hot Ho has brisket, barbecue sauce, jalapeños, grilled onions and bell pepper. But, if you want to keep it simple, you can get a Dried Up Ho -- just plain meat and cheese. They even have Cold Hearted Hos (ice cream).

After I ordered, the cashier sent my ticket back to the kitchen through a small curtain-covered window. Within a few minutes I heard the grill sizzle and come to life as the cool meat was slapped down and began to cook. Then the scent of the sharp spices came on fast -- my olfactory senses telling me this spot is more than just a name.

Since everything is made to order, I waited about 10 minutes, although I would soon consider myself justly rewarded. From behind the kitchen window, the supposed fat ho called my number then pulled the curtain back and, with a sweet grin, handed me a brown paper bag already dotted with grease stains.

The clock was ticking and I had to get back on the road, but only got a couple bites down before I realized I had to pull over to eat. You need both hands for a Supa Dupa Fly Ho.

Fat Ho Burgers is tucked a way off the beaten path, but it's an easy half-mile off Interstate 35 and well worth the diversion.

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Lauren Drewes Daniels is the Dallas Observer's food editor. She started writing about local restaurants, chefs, beer and kouign-amanns in 2011. She's driven through two dirt devils and is certain they were both some type of cosmic force.