Concerts

10 Best Concerts of the Week: Pussy Riot, St. Vincent, Manchester Orchestra and More

Daddy's Home singer St. Vincent comes home to North Texas Saturday Night at The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory.
Daddy's Home singer St. Vincent comes home to North Texas Saturday Night at The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory. Mike Brooks
This is a week to get out, get active and see something new. Rain or shine, Denton will be hosting two very different festivals this weekend just about a mile away from each other, and both include legendary performers. Friday night, Waxahatchee will groove on the Granada stage while Cradle of Filth starts breaking in the new venue Amplified Live, though Amplified Live won't have its official opening festivities until Tuesday night's Manchester Orchestra show — which Wavves will keep going on Wednesday night. Saturday night will be a time for dancing, whether you pick St. Vincent or Chromeo as your concert destination of choice. On Saturday afternoon, however, there is only one choice — Pussy Riot's DJ set at Thunderbird Station following the Dallas Reproductive Liberation March that meets at Main Street Garden Park at 1 p.m. And there's still more to check out if none of that moves you.
Denton Arts & Jazz Festival
3 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Oct. 1-3, at Quakertown Park, 321 E. McKinney St., Free

Now in its 41st year, The Denton Arts & Jazz Festival will go on this weekend after being rescheduled 18 months ago from its regular springtime occurrence in Quakertown Park. This year, to help reduce crowding, event organizers have spaced out the vendor tents and eliminated the Center Stage at the Senior Center. The six outdoor stages remain, however, to bring you three full days of non-stop jazz, folk, blues, country, rock, Tejano, conjunto, Tex-Mex and polka. Attendees can look forward to performances by festival regulars Brave Combo and all of the various other jazz combos that make up Denton's vibrant jazz scene. For the arts portion of the festival, each year dozens of vendors set up shop in Quakertown Park with plenty of art to see and purchase. There will also be activities for the kids and six different food courts to satisfy whatever you might be craving.
No Coast Festival
5 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Oct. 1-3, at Rubber Gloves Rehearsal Studios, 411 E. Sycamore St., $15-$35 at prekindle.com

About a mile down the road from the Denton Arts & Jazz Festival, an entirely different festival will take place at Rubber Gloves. No Coast is a noise rock festival with a mission to bring together local and national bands for an epic three-day event. This year it offers 20 bands from around the country, kicking off early Friday evening with a performance by Sub-Sahara. Friday's headliner is legendary New York City noise rock trio Unsane. The band, founded in 1988, has been credited for laying the blueprint for noise rock bands to come. Festival-goers can also look forward to performances by more local bands such as WHEP and genre legends Season to Risk. There is also an exciting amount of national acts coming together which we haven't seen much of in North Texas. This is an event worth exploring by anyone with an open mind and ear for uncommon music.
Waxahatchee
8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 1, at Granada Theater, 3524 Greenville Ave., $23 at prekindle.com

Formed in 2010 by singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield, Waxahatchee is an indie-rock project founded in the folk tradition. Named after Waxahatchee Creek in Alabama where Crutchfield grew up, the band has released five albums to date — each one garnering more attention than the last. The band's latest, Saint Cloud, released on Merge Records in March 2020, draws its inspiration from the singer's struggles with alcoholism and her decision to get sober. The album was featured on dozens of "Best of 2020" lists, drawing praise for its rich textures and vivid scenes that marked a clear transformation from the band's early, lo-fi productions. Providing opening support for Waxahatchee this Friday at Granada Theater is Nashville singer-songwriter Kat Kirby, whose debut release Cool Dry Place was named Stereogum's album of the week this past spring.
Cradle of Filth
8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 1, at Amplified Live, 10261 Technology Blvd. E., $30 at seetickets.us


English extreme metal band Cradle of Filth returns to Dallas, playing Amplified Live this Friday on its Lustmore and Tourgasm tour. The band is set to play their 1998 album Cruelty and the Beast in its entirety followed by an extended encore set of fan favorites from the band's 30-year career. Drawing inspiration from Gothic poetry, mythology and horror films, Cradle of Filth has always had a penchant for the dramatic. While their performances make use of satanic imagery, the band has gotten more kids into Victorian literature than it has into devil-worshipping. Joining Cradle of Filth on this tour are 3Teeth — an industrial metal band out of Los Angeles that goes well with Ministry, Skinny Puppy or KMFDM — and Once Human, a female-fronted melodic death metal band also hailing from L.A. that features former Soulfly and Machine Head guitarist Logan Mader.
Pussy Riot (DJ set)
4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, at Thunderbird Station, 3400 Commerce St., $20 at squadup.com

What better time could there be to see Pussy Riot, even if it is just a DJ set? Immediately following the Dallas Reproductive Liberation March this Saturday, Pussy Riot frontwoman Nadya Tolokonnikova will take over the 1s and 2s at Thunderbird Station to help raise money for the Texas Equal Access Fund, which provides financial and emotional support to women seeking abortion care.  The march and show come in response to Texas' adoption of the controversial Senate Bill 8, a measure that effectively outlawed most abortions in the state beginning Sept. 1. The set runs from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Thunderbird Station has a maximum capacity of 500 people, and with a march that is expected to be huge, it might be good to get your tickets now. There's no telling what Tolokonnikova has in store for the audience, but it's safe to say that it will be the perfect place to channel your very outrage and form bonds with activists and other like-minded individuals.
Chromeo
8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, at Arlington Backyard, 1650 E Randol Mill Rd. Suite 140, $20-$35 at axs.com

An electro-funk duo from Montreal, Chromeo makes the kind of music that people just love to dance to. Fronted by Dave 1 (aka David Macklovitch), a doctoral candidate in French literature at Columbia University and lecturer at Barnard College, Chromeo brings humor and fun with every performance. The group has released five albums over the course of their nearly two-decade-long career, receiving their first Grammy nomination in 2018 for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical for their dance chart-topping album Head Over Heels. Last year, the duo released their five-song EP Quarantine Casanova, each song dealing with some element of our shared quarantine experience (e.g. "Clorox Wipe," "6 Feet Away," "Stay in Bed (And Do Nothing)," "'Roni Got Me Stressed Out" and "Cabin Fever"). Local bands Smoking With Strangers and Electric Tongues will provide opening support for Chromeo Saturday night at the Arlington Backyard at Texas Live!
St. Vincent
8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, at The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory, 300 W. Las Colinas Blvd., $39+ at livenation.com

Lake Highlands High School graduate Annie Clark (aka St. Vincent) returns to North Texas Saturday night, bringing her Daddy's Home tour to The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory with opening support from Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Cassandra Jenkins. Inspired by Clark's father's release from prison in 2019 after a 12-year stint for a $43 million stock manipulation scheme, St. Vincent's latest album Daddy's Home stretches beyond the singer's personal experiences as a means to make a wider comment about the indignity of the prison system. Inspired by 1970s New York and the look of Cassavetes heroines, St. Vincent's current sound is as gritty as it is dancey and as playful as it is thought-provoking. The artist has always been known to put on a spectacular performance, and we expect her hometown show to be no exception. 
Band of Horses
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5, at House of Blues, 2200 N. Lamar St., $35+ at livenation.com

Coming out of Seattle in 2004 and riding the wave of indie-rock that dominated campus radio throughout the '00s, Band of Horses is determined to stay relevant despite its setbacks. After guitarist Tyler Ramsey and bass player Bill Reynolds quit the band in 2017 not long after their widely acclaimed fifth album Why Are You OK, Band of Horses has released a small handful of singles but not much else to mention. Now a full band again, Band of Horses plays Tuesday night at House of Blues in Dallas with opening support from the Texas Piano Man himself, Robert Ellis. Ellis is a true songwriter who can make an audience laugh, cry, dance or stand perfectly still with the stroke of the keys. His brand of country should provide a great foil for Band of Horses whose luscious music is always breathtaking albeit somewhat depressing.
Manchester Orchestra
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5, at Amplified Live, 10261 Technology Blvd. E., $90 at stubhub.com

Celebrating its official launch as Amplified Live, the former Gas Monkey Bar 'n' Grill will host Atlanta indie-rock band Manchester Orchestra with opening acts Foxing and Slothrust. Boasting a new stage, new décor, new video and a new sound system, Amplified Live is the perfect place for Manchester Orchestra to tour its latest album The Million Masks of God, which expanded the band's sound and cinematic scope. The band's sixth album, The Million Masks of God was released in February this year and was met with much critical acclaim as well as commercial success. The band has always concentrated a lot of lyrical attention on spiritual matters, and here, pay special attention to the shifting relationship with our preferred deity as we age. Slothrust and Foxing are also touring new albums, so it is sure to be a night of familiar faces and unfamiliar songs. The show is officially sold out, but there are still plenty of tickets available through StubHub.
Wavves
8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 6, at Amplified Live, 10261 Technology Blvd. E., $25+ at seetickets.us

Touring in support of their July release Hideaway, indie-surf rock band Wavves keeps the party going at Amplified Live on Wednesday night with special guests, the lo-fi, oldies throwback SadGirl. Once a lightning rod for controversy, singer Nathan Williams has mellowed out a lot since the band's early days, but Wavves' music still burns as bright as always. With songs about cutting toxic people out of your life, ballads and the band's signature catchy hooks, Hideaway builds on the foundation laid on the band's self-titled and King of the Beach albums. It is no surprise that Hideaway marks the band's return to Fat Possum records, which released those previous two albums. Wavves has always kept a close-knit and cult-like following that always returns the energy the band puts out from the stage. For as mellow and beachy as the band can be, you can expect some serious moshing when the tempo goes up and the guitars get fuzzier.
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David Fletcher writes about music, arts and culture for the Dallas Observer. You can usually find him at a show in Deep Ellum whether he's writing about it or not. A punk scholar and local music enthusiast, David focuses his attention on the artists screaming in the margins of Dallas' music scene.
Contact: David Fletcher